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industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
's about if you are immediately engaged in the work environment together, it's allowing for more opportunities selling someone to take on a new project or allowing someone to maybe how could i say flesh out ideas and actually put them in place and then learned from that because not everything is going to be perfect. but knowing that even if it doesn't come out right someone is going to say it's okay. it's okay. we are we to work on getting a better. i think that's where he learned the most about leadership and about how to conduct perfect but it is you want to do. men do it with men and with women, too to read these relationships are always down for women and we shouldn't be ashamed of that. >> we ask you what you were watching when you were 17 that would have made this a little bit easier and you said keep striving. never lose heart. it's not about how much time you get knocked down but it's about how many times you get back up and it's what you do after you get back up and brush yourself off that really matters. i just wondered if there was any specific time you could talk abou
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
an interesting expression. she said, i grew up in an environment that was christian in which people followed their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that t
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
care, but economics, education, climate change, the environment. i think you see a lot of different opinions and thoughts and ideas of how to get sun and how we find compromise in the united states senate. >> host: how did that play out in the number of leadership roles in congress? >> guest: is a great place to be. we have a new number and then in the senate serving as chairs of committees. in fact, senator barbara mikulski is the first woman to serve as the chair of the powerful appropriations committee and how that would change dynamics of the committee will see in the years to come. dianne feinstein in charge of intelligence. barbara boxer, more and more. patty murray goes through the list on budgets. and on the high side, we now have seven women ranking on major committees in the house. i should remind you that the house republicans a course in the majority have zero win in sharing any major committees. in fact, they are all white and cherry age or communities that have one women sharing a minor committee and that happens to be the administration committee. so we feel we are in
assessments that might take against the various environments that the secretary mentioned. and we're engaged -- i've told you, we're engaged in planning to develop options against alternative futures. alternative future one collaboration or permissiveness all of which would have different requirements. >> you talk now possibility of training rebels -- >> i haven't heard that. that's not a request we've head. i don't know if they would have don't that request through some other channel. [inaudible] >> we're not working on options that involve boots on on the ground with, you know, i think you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved they might ask for tax in that situation. but in a hostile situation, we're not planning for that. >> back to general dempsey, i asked whether there was militarily anything there was the u.s. could do to stop the assad regime from using chemical weapons. >> the act of preventing the use of chemical weapons wash almost unachievable, jennifer, you have to have such clarity of intelligence, you k
't need because of the change in the geopolitical environment the stealthy helicopter or the high end artillery. based on what you're seeing in the geopolitical situation, what does that mean future investment. what should be we investing in what should we continue to buy more of? less of. are there vampire programs with using your phraseologies that should be cut? what is the geopolitical environment mean for investment? >> well, again, my friends in the army are mad at me. unfortunately, i think there is here a shift what was the phrase bob used longer, large, basically large prolonged -- [inaudible conversations] >> yeah. that's a good prediction today. who in august of 2001 reconduct -- predicted we would have one in afghanistan? i think it's a dangerous thing in the business. it seems to me to that we needs to strengthen our maritime capability in the western pacific and not to contain china or fight a war with china, god for bid. i think the goal has got to be to try to sustain the peaceful situation, which is only thirty years old. it's the -- we have a huge interest, i think,
and your observations on that nexus between the environment and the economy, and then i want to come to gayle, switching gears entirely, and going back to the state park concept you mentioned in your opening remark, so, frank? >> thank you, lynn. we did travel to brazil together. i've never seen a more energetic herder than lynn. [laughter] she recognizedded most of the things we saw, including some i think you have never seen before. it's important to know why we went to brazil and what that tells us about the subject we are talking about today. we went there because we wanted to find out how brazil was doing in its effort to reduce the deep forrestation that was taking place in the amazon. is the first thing we did once we got there was go to a slaughter house. we looked at each other and said, we didn't sign up for that. what's that have to do with deforestation? turns out brazil's effort to reduce deforestization was to enact a law that required certain land owners, many land owners, to take a certain part of their land, a fraction of their land and keep that in natural state, me
that environment or because some folks use television as something to unwind with and so they didn't particularly care to spend their time in that world in that way. however, many folks felt as though the story was told truthfully and clearly and without apology. that is what we have been told. i am talking about folks in law enforcement. i am talking about judges and attorneys. also politicians, as well as folks whose lives were depicted by some of the street characters. they felt that someone was fighting for them and gay-rights c-span: we saw you when you testified in baltimore, i believe it was at the attorney general's task force, let's watch this clip and kept up with your story. >> i remember lying in bed as i heard an argument growing and my parents bedroom. only to remember the deafening sound of my mother's jaw being crushed. i remember her head on the kitchen chopping block and my father holding a knife to her throat and my mother asking to be put out of her misery. our member asking my father to stop and not make mommy cried. i was two years old. that was the pattern that made me feel
, patty murray, borba boxer, chair of the environment. we have seven women now on the democratic side that are ranking members, and on the republican sign, every major committee is led by a white mail. in -- white male. in fact there's only one woman chairing a minor committee, and they fav her administration. what does this mean? women's leadership changes the conversation at these negotiations tables. there's a story of serving on the house armed services committee, and when they were talking about military reddiness, she and women like gabby giffords were there to ask questions about personnel and supplies, but also about mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. all of which is important for military readiness. and so you can't tell me that if we had two or three women involved in this fiscal cliff debate in the last month, that we wouldn't have gotten it done faster. i was at home over the holidays with my dad, and we all knew where we would end up. there were going to be tax increases. may have been at 300,000 or 4 hon thousand. there wasn't an american i
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
-tune plans and programs as we confront both the dynamic security environment in the nation's fiscal challenges as well. will it just in compromise is necessary, but we will be brought consensus that the congress on the way forward to avoid a hollow military. this must be our priority. nevertheless, despite enduring challenges, i'm please to note our air force had made progress in any areas and can point to a number of accomplishment during the past calendar year. we work through the act did reserve component for structure challenges that were part of the fy 13 president's budget proposal to produce a compromise which congress passed unfreezing previously approved for structure changes. we confronted the problem of assaults and unprofessional relationships that basic military training and have come the defenders. we're strengthening our prevention efforts in recent initiatives in this area include the air force might help them while for inspection the establishment of a special but this council program. with regard to space launch, the air force completed nine successful national sec
security environment and the nation's fiscal challenges as well. we will adjust and compromise as necessary but we will need broad consensus with congress on the way forward to avoid a hollow military. this must be our priority. nevertheless, despite enduring challenges i'm pleased to note that air force has made progress in many areas and can point to a number of accomplishments -- accomplishments during the past calendar year. it worked for the active component and reserve component force structure challenges that were part of the fy13 residents budget proposal to produce a compromise which congress passed on freezing previously approved force structure changes. we confronted the problem of sexual assaults and unprofessional relationships that basic military training and have convicted defenders. we are strengthening our sexual assault prevention efforts and recent initiatives include the air force wide health and welfare inspection and the establishment of the special victims counsel program. with regard to space launch, the air force completed nine secession will space launch campaigns
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
: what do we do to create the sort of environment now that we can both compromise? is it just something that happens when a nation is created and when a nation is continued? >> guest: i think there have been a lot of times in our history. i think that the constitution is a very good -- i call that in the book the engine of compromise. it propels us toward compromise and one of the ways it does it is by making it really easy to shut the whole thing down. it takes very little to bring government to writing hault. you know a couple of people in congress can do it in the president can do it in a few people on supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than then to make things happen. what drives compromise is the need to do something, they need to move forward. and i think that we are always going to have a lot of political theater and i love it. i am an english major with a background in theater, so i love the theatrical element of our politics. i think it's fascinating. i think it's dramatic and it's tragic. it's a wonderful bit of literature. >> host: in the
environment. my friends and i kind of had a romantic at the end of starting a used book store. we both had an english degrees and used to go around to different bookstores and thought it would be need to open one. and we did and quickly found that we did not know anything about business or the book business. he dropped out and pursue the other quests, and i kind of stuck with it. at that time there was a magazine called the antiquarian book ms. whitley. and people, the first 25 or 30 pages or articles about the book trade, and the rest of the magazine or lists of books for sale and then the back of the magazine from the books that people wanted. so that was pretty much how i learned about the book business going through that magazine every week and quoting books to other dealers and reading the articles. we started in 81 in the basement of a building up the streets. in its that was the name, seller of stories because we began in the basement. we have a little bit of everything. we also have in-depth collections of ryland history. we have a lot of math books. we have art and architecture, m
environment of the match such as that. >> i spoke with a man that a range of the match race who died a couple of years ago, and he said this was an event that every single person in america cared about, and it was in every single newspaper. i went through hundreds of papers and you can see it in virtually every single one, a big front-page stories people speculating and getting angry about it, the whole nation divided up. on race day we got 40,000 people and there was only seat for 16,000. 10,000 people were out of the gates hanging from trees and sitting on offenses in the room to see the race and all the people we spoke to that were there that day for all kids at the time said that was the greatest sporting event they ever saw curious connect you have seen probably every photo imaginable, but for those of you describe that photograph for me. what is this? >> that's the start. they had the starting date because the war admiral was a high strong horse at the gate and that is the top of the stretch. >> for those of you that are here we will pass this around. but take a look at the fence behind
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
extent. the uncertainty of it all fascinated me, as does my environment, just by nature. so the book ends up being very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth, and how over time, it changes. the same substance, stone, rock, water, wood, guess from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat, and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality, all the way. from childhood lower, immortal, to our elder years, where we become the archive, where we become the thing which holds so many people we have lost and is what survives. memory is what survives, and within that memory, the afterlife of so much. so, thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago i certainly did not expect i would end up here, or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think everything we have heard so far is a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never h
and one is to mr. dove -- when no one of your main arguments is that it's a good environment for negotiations of a similar situation, describing 2004. now, i want to know in light of all the -- that we have heard the government perceived by the taliban and the u.s. is pulling for the americans why would you say that the americans -- to talabani's in a situation -- [inaudible] could you please elaborate more and the other question is that in passing i heard something about india and iran. i would like to hear some more on that to see whether iran and india together or individually have any role in the play as you'll discuss. thank you very much. >> hi, katie from the department of state. you kind of reference the growth of ttp to the lack of support received by the pakistani civilian law-enforcement bodies. i wanted to see if you could kindly clarify whether the support you are looking for there was financial or domestic, political will and why do you think that support is provided to you? >> the gentleman behind. >> hi. i'm with the u.s. -- religious freedom. the role of reli
ever could've done anything close to a time, but given the domestic political environment, international situation that we are in, the weakness of our economy, you know, probably nothing about the seven or eight was in the cards, but it's worth looking at a 10 comparing what we have to realize why we are not in the best of all possible worlds at this point. issue one is really the big enchilada, which is doing the one turn fiscal balance that we face in an accessible way and that would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about, but was unachievable, which was the grand bargain between the president and the congressional leaders on a package of tax and spending policies that over the next 10, 12 years would destabilize the debt to gdp ratio and that would send the package somewhere in the two to $3 trillion range. of course there wasn't time. the time between the election in january 1st 2 workup of his details, give up the fact we have to political parties snarling at each other and not a whole lot of the way of negotiations. that really wasn't in the cards, but a ni
close to a 10, but given the domestic political environment, international situation, the weakness of our economy, you know, ugly nothing but a southerner he was in the cards, but it's worth looking at a 10 and comparing it to what we have two realize where we are not the best of all possible worlds at this point. okay, issue one is really the big enchilada, which is dealing with the long-term fiscal balance that we phase and i would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about, but was unachievable, which was the grand bargain between the president and the congressional leaders on a package of tax and spending policies that over the next 10, 12 years would've stabilized the debt to gdp ratio and that would've been a package somewhere in the two to $3 trillion range. of course there really wasn't time, the tightening between the election in january 1st to recover details. so if you respect even of the fact that we have a two political parties snarling at each other and not a whole lot in the way of negotiations, there really wasn't in the cards, but a nine, which would have com
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
influenced environment speaking to members of their own discipline-based tribe and try to help them translate their work to a larger audience and that sometimes can be a real challenge. but it goes to the heart of what oxford should be doing which is not publishing works to very small groups of intellectuals, although that is a crucial part of what we do, but also trying to identify works that are broader input and trying to bring those works to people who are interested who did do not reside in the academy. so i think the subtitle of the session today is the publishing world today and tomorrow and i want to look back a little bit and tell you the differences that i have tracked in the last 25 years of my time in publishing through the prism of how people have responded say at a cocktail party when i tell them i'm in publishing. it used to be that there were essentially two. the first response was to ask me whether i've read anything that was published which is obviously completely impossible and the other was to tell me about the book ideas. and that of course is exactly as it should be. tha
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
of a stable political system, by improved institutional environment, land rights, rule of law, judicial reform. none of this changes are going to happen overnight. and it's very hard for people in mr. mudd answer to elected officials or have to answer to boards of directors who are saying, show me the results. it's very hard for us to come to terms with the fact that the engagement of habitat for humanity for 27 years in haiti may actually be a really brief moment of time, not a long moment of time. but we need to begin to highlight the time of dimension what is happening. and that links to another theme which came through, throughout the proceedings today. we need to try to develop appropriate untenable standards of success. are the 10,000 homes and 55,000, people housed in a project that eric talked about, is that an accomplishment? yes, it is an encouragement but it's not necessarily, it doesn't seem like anacondas but if you talk about 2 million displaced people. like time when we think about what we mean by success, we have to operate at several different levels, and we can't find ourselv
because of the -- of an environment that says, anything goes. so there's a reason for regulations. not just to stifle business. the police we see on their corneres are an example of regulation. that same idea goes up and beyond that. the financial things as well. >> host: ken in atlanta, georgia. you're on the air. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen, this is just a treat. just a real pleasure to hear you and i've got some good news for you. right now, on youtube, there's a seven and a half minute film narrated by former president of georgia tech, incidentally georgia tech won the ball game the other day -- but georgia tech's president, the name of this film is, all american citizen team. and it is an effort that the georgia general assembly has been involved in since the 1970s, and we found out that there is a problem and it takes us back to a country western song, looking for love in all the wrong places. >> guest: one of our favorites. >> caller: we don't have problem with the government and we don't have a problem with elected officials. the problem turns out to be the folks
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